Kangaatsiaq means "rather small promontory”, and the town is Greenland's youngest as it first achieved status as a town in 1986, but the settlement itself is of course much older.

Kangaatsiaq is an unspoilt little town, where there are no large hotels or tourist offices - in fact there is only private accommodation available and a single internet cafe. Among the many colourful single-family homes here you can write home to friends and family about an authentic and almost unspoilt town in Greenland.

Among the many colourful single-family homes here you can write home to friends and family about an authentic and almost unspoilt town in Greenland.

  • Kangaatsiaq achieved status as a town in 1986 and is thereby the youngest town in Greenland.
  • Nearest town is Aasiaat.
  • The primary occupation is fishing and hunting.
  • In the wintertime is dog sledding and snowmobile the best means of transport in the city.
  • There are no hotels, but there are accommodation options - either private accommodation or by the municipality.
  • Very few tourists have visited this small town with its huge fjords and islands, inlets and bays.

Close to the Greenlandic countryside

East of Kangaatsiaq, a 150 km wide fjord system opens with countless islands, inlets and bays, and there are good opportunities to explore the protected waters by boat, canoe or sea kayak.

Along the way, there is ample opportunity to discover the wildlife, which includes reindeer, fox, and hare, as well as many different species of birds. In the sea around Kangaatsiaq, many species of marine mammals live, such as harp seals, humpback whales and minke whales.

Dog sledding and kayaking

During winter and spring, the dog sled is the most suitable means of transport for hunting and sport. However, travel routes to and from Kangaatsiaq are normally by ship, from either Aasiaat or Sisimiut.

The great importance of fishing and hunting still characterises the townscape. Between the dogs and sleds there are drying racks for fish and meat, adorned with stretched sealskins, yarn, buoys and kayaks.

Approximately 550 people live in Kangaatsiaq, and just over 700 live in the four settlements at Attu, Niaqornaarsuk, Ikerasaarsuk and Iginniarfik.

 

In the sea around Kangaatsiaq, many species of marine mammals live, such as harp seals, humpback whales and minke whales.